New International Reader's Version

Leviticus 13

Rules About Skin Diseases

1The Lord spoke to Moses and Aaron. He told them to say to the people, “Suppose someone’s skin has a swelling or a rash or a shiny spot. And suppose it could become a skin disease. Then they must be brought to the priest Aaron. Or they must be brought to a priest in Aaron’s family line. The priest must look carefully at the sore on the person’s skin. He must see whether the hair in the sore has turned white. He must also see whether the sore seems to be under the skin. If the sore is white and is under the skin, it is a skin disease. When the priest looks that person over carefully, he must announce that the person is ‘unclean.’ Suppose the shiny spot on the skin is white but does not seem to be under the skin. And suppose the hair in the spot has not turned white. Then the priest must make the person stay away from everyone else for seven days. On the seventh day the priest must look carefully at the sore again. Suppose it has not changed and has not spread in the skin. Then the priest must make the person stay away from everyone else for another seven days. On the seventh day the priest must look carefully at the sore again. If it has faded and has not spread, he must announce that the person is ‘clean.’ It is only a rash. That person must wash their clothes. They will be ‘clean.’ But suppose the rash spreads in the skin after they have shown themselves to the priest a second time. Then they must appear in front of the priest again. The priest must look carefully at the sore. If the rash has spread, he must announce that the person is ‘unclean.’ They have a skin disease.

“When anyone has a skin disease, they must be brought to the priest. 10 The priest must look them over carefully. Suppose there is a white swelling in the skin. Suppose it has turned the hair white. And suppose there are open sores in the swelling. 11 Then the person has a skin disease that will never go away. The priest must announce that they are ‘unclean.’ The priest must not make them stay away from everyone else. They are already ‘unclean.’

12 “Suppose the disease breaks out all over their skin. And suppose it covers them from head to foot, as far as the priest can tell. 13 Then the priest must look them over carefully. If the disease has covered their whole body, the priest must announce that they are ‘clean.’ All their skin has turned white. So they are ‘clean.’ 14 But when open sores appear on their skin, they will not be ‘clean.’ 15 When the priest sees the open sores, he must announce that they are ‘unclean.’ The open sores are not ‘clean.’ They have a skin disease. 16 But if the open sores change and turn white, they must go to the priest. 17 The priest must look them over carefully. If the sores have turned white, the priest must announce that the person is ‘clean.’ Then they will be ‘clean.’

18 “Suppose someone has a boil on their skin and it heals. 19 And suppose a white swelling or shiny pink spot appears where the boil was. Then they must show themselves to the priest. 20 The priest must look at the boil carefully. Suppose it seems to be under the skin. And suppose the hair in it has turned white. Then the priest must announce that the person is ‘unclean.’ A skin disease has broken out where the boil was. 21 But suppose that when the priest looks at the boil carefully, there is no white hair in it. The boil is not under the skin. And it has faded. Then the priest must make the person stay away from everyone else for seven days. 22 If the boil is spreading in the skin, the priest must announce that the person is ‘unclean.’ They have a skin disease. 23 But suppose the spot has not changed. And suppose it has not spread. Then it is only a scar from the boil. And the priest must announce that the person is ‘clean.’

24 “Suppose someone has a burn on their skin. And suppose a white or shiny pink spot shows up in the open sores of the burn. 25 Then the priest must look at the spot carefully. Suppose the hair in it has turned white. And suppose the spot seems to be under the skin. Then the person has a skin disease. It has broken out where they were burned. The priest must announce that the person is ‘unclean.’ They have a skin disease. 26 But suppose the priest looks at the spot carefully. Suppose there is no white hair in it. Suppose the spot is not under the skin. And suppose it has faded. Then the priest must make the person stay away from everyone else for seven days. 27 On the seventh day the priest must look them over carefully. If the spot is spreading in the skin, the priest must announce that the person is ‘unclean.’ They have a skin disease. 28 But suppose the spot has not changed. It has not spread in the skin. And it has faded. Then the burn has caused it to swell. The priest must announce that the person is ‘clean.’ It is only a scar from the burn.

29 “Suppose a man or woman has a sore on their head or chin. 30 Then the priest must look at the sore carefully. Suppose it seems to be under the skin. And suppose the hair in the sore is yellow and thin. Then the priest must announce that the person is ‘unclean.’ The sore is a skin disease on the head or chin. 31 But suppose the priest looks carefully at the sore. It does not seem to be under the skin. And there is no black hair in it. Then the priest must make the person stay away from everyone else for seven days. 32 On the seventh day the priest must look at the sore carefully. Suppose it has not spread in the skin. It does not have any yellow hair in it. And it does not seem to be under the skin. 33 Then the man or woman must shave their head. But they must not shave the area where the disease is. And the priest must make them stay away from everyone else for another seven days. 34 On the seventh day the priest must look at the sore carefully. Suppose it has not spread in the skin. And suppose it does not seem to be under the skin. Then the priest must announce that the person is ‘clean.’ They must wash their clothes. They will be ‘clean.’ 35 But suppose the sore spreads in the skin after the priest announces that the person is ‘clean.’ 36 Then the priest must look them over carefully. Suppose the sore has spread. Then the priest does not have to look for yellow hair. The person is ‘unclean.’ 37 But suppose the sore has stopped and black hair has grown there, as far as the priest can tell. Then the person is healed and is ‘clean.’ The priest must announce that they are ‘clean.’

38 “Suppose a man or woman has white spots on the skin. 39 Then the priest must look at them carefully. Suppose he sees that the spots are dull white. Then a harmless rash has broken out on the skin. That person is ‘clean.’

40 “Suppose a man loses all the hair on his head. Then he is ‘clean.’ 41 Suppose he loses only the hair on the front of his head. Then he is ‘clean.’ 42 But suppose he has a shiny pink sore on his head where his hair was. Then he has a skin disease. It is breaking out on his whole head or on the front of his head. 43 The priest must look him over carefully. Suppose the swollen sore on his head or on the front of it is pink and shiny. And suppose it looks like a skin disease. 44 Then he has a skin disease. He is ‘unclean.’ The priest must announce that the man is ‘unclean.’ That’s because he has a sore on his head.

45 “Suppose someone has a skin disease that makes them ‘unclean.’ Then they must wear torn clothes. They must let their hair hang loose. They must cover the lower part of their face. They must cry out, ‘Unclean! Unclean!’ 46 As long as they have the disease, they remain ‘unclean.’ They must live alone. They must live outside the camp.

Rules About Mold

47 “Suppose some clothes have mold on them. The clothes could be made out of wool or linen. 48 Or there could be cloth woven or knitted out of linen or wool. There could be pieces of leather. Or there could be things that are made out of leather. 49 And suppose the mold on the clothes or on the woven or knitted cloth looks green or red. Or suppose the green or red mold is on the pieces of leather or the leather goods. Then it is mold that spreads. It must be shown to the priest. 50 The priest must look at it carefully. He must keep the thing with the mold on it away from everything else for seven days. 51 On the seventh day he must look at it carefully. Suppose the mold has spread in the clothes or in the woven or knitted cloth. Or suppose it has spread on the pieces of leather or on the leather goods. Then it is mold that destroys. The thing is ‘unclean.’ 52 The priest must burn everything with the mold in it. He must burn the clothes or the woven or knitted cloth made out of wool or linen. He must burn the leather goods. The mold destroys. So everything must be burned.

53 “But suppose the priest looks at the thing carefully. The mold has not spread in the clothes. And it has not spread in the woven or knitted cloth or in the leather goods. 54 Then he will order someone to wash the thing with the mold on it. After that, the priest must keep that thing away from everything else for another seven days. 55 After the thing with the mold on it has been washed, the priest must look at it again carefully. Suppose the way the mold looks has not changed. Then even though the mold has not spread, it is ‘unclean.’ Burn it. It does not matter which side of the thing the mold is on. 56 But suppose the priest looks at it carefully. And suppose the mold has faded after the thing has been washed. Then the priest must tear out the part with mold on it. He must tear it out of the clothes or leather. He must tear it out of the woven or knitted cloth. 57 But suppose it shows up again in the clothes. Or suppose it shows up again in the woven or knitted cloth or in the leather goods. Then it is spreading. Everything with the mold on it must be burned. 58 The clothes that have been washed and do not have any more mold on them must be washed again. So must the woven or knitted cloth or the leather goods. Then they will be ‘clean.’ ”

59 These are the rules about what to do with anything with mold on it. They apply to clothes that are made out of wool or linen. They apply to woven and knitted cloth and to leather goods. They give a priest directions about when to announce whether something is “clean” or “unclean.”

La Bible du Semeur

Lévitique 13

Les lois sur les maladies de peau évolutives et les moisissures

Les maladies de la peau

1L’Eternel parla à Moïse et à Aaron en ces termes : Si une boursouflure, une dartre ou une tache sur la peau de quelqu’un devient une plaie qui fait suspecter une maladie de peau évolutive[a], on l’amènera au prêtre Aaron ou à l’un de ses descendants. Celui-ci examinera cette affection de la peau. Si, à l’endroit malade, les poils sont devenus blancs et si la plaie forme un creux dans la peau, c’est bien un cas de maladie de peau évolutive. Sur la base de l’examen, le prêtre déclarera cette personne impure. Mais si la tache blanche ne forme pas de creux visible de la peau, et si le poil n’est pas devenu blanc, le prêtre isolera le sujet pendant sept jours. Le septième jour, il l’examinera. S’il constate que le mal est resté stationnaire sans s’étendre sur la peau, il isolera le malade une deuxième semaine, puis il procédera à un nouvel examen. Si la partie malade s’est estompée, et ne s’est pas étendue sur la peau, le prêtre déclarera cet homme pur ; c’est une simple dartre. La personne nettoiera ses vêtements et sera pure. Mais si la dartre s’étend sur la peau après que le prêtre a examiné la personne et l’ait déclarée pure, celle-ci retournera se faire examiner par le prêtre. Si celui-ci constate une extension de la dartre sur la peau, il déclarera la personne impure : c’est une maladie de peau évolutive.

Lorsqu’un homme sera suspecté d’être atteint d’une maladie de peau évolutive, on l’amènera au prêtre 10 qui l’examinera. S’il constate une boursouflure blanche sur la peau qui ait fait blanchir le poil et qu’il y ait un bourgeonnement de chair vive dans la tumeur, 11 c’est une maladie de peau infectieuse et chronique. Le prêtre déclarera cet homme impur ; il ne sera pas nécessaire de l’isoler, car il est manifestement impur. 12 Mais si cette affection s’étend sur toute la peau du malade et le couvre de la tête aux pieds, où que porte le regard du prêtre, 13 celui-ci procédera à un nouvel examen. S’il constate que l’éruption couvre tout le corps du malade, il le déclarera pur : puisqu’il est devenu complètement blanc, il est pur. 14 Toutefois, le jour où l’on apercevra sur lui de la chair vive, il devient impur. 15 Après avoir constaté la présence de cette chair vive, le prêtre déclarera la personne impure : la chair vive est impure : c’est une maladie de peau évolutive. 16 Si la chair vive redevient blanche, la personne retournera auprès du prêtre 17 qui l’examinera. S’il constate que la plaie est effectivement devenue blanche, il déclarera la chair pure, et la personne sera en état de pureté.

18 Si quelqu’un avait sur la peau un abcès[b] qui a guéri, 19 mais qu’à la place de cet abcès apparaisse une boursouflure blanche ou une tache d’un blanc rougeâtre, cette personne se fera examiner par le prêtre. 20 Si celui-ci constate un creux dans la peau et un blanchissement du poil, il déclarera cette personne impure : c’est une affection de peau infectieuse qui est en train de bourgeonner dans l’abcès. 21 Mais si, à l’examen, le prêtre constate qu’il n’y a pas de poil blanc à cet endroit, ni de creux dans la peau et que la tache s’est estompée, il isolera le malade pendant sept jours. 22 Si la tache s’étend sur la peau, il le déclarera impur : c’est une plaie infectieuse. 23 Mais si la tache est restée stationnaire, sans s’étendre, ce n’est que la cicatrice de l’abcès ; alors le prêtre le déclarera pur.

24 Autre cas : lorsque la peau de quelqu’un aura une brûlure causée par le feu et qu’il se forme sur l’endroit de cette brûlure une tache blanche ou d’un blanc rougeâtre, 25 le prêtre l’examinera ; si le poil a viré au blanc dans la tache et s’il y a un creux dans la peau, c’est une affection de peau infectieuse qui s’est développée sur la brûlure. Le prêtre déclarera cette personne impure, car elle est atteinte d’une maladie de peau évolutive.

26 Si, au contraire, le prêtre, à l’examen, ne constate pas de poils blancs dans la tache, ni de creux dans la peau, et si la tache s’est estompée, il isolera le sujet pendant sept jours. 27 Il l’examinera le septième jour, si la tache s’est étendue sur la peau, il le déclarera impur : c’est une plaie infectieuse. 28 Mais si la tache est restée stationnaire, sans s’étendre, et qu’elle s’est estompée, c’était une boursouflure due à la brûlure ; le prêtre déclarera donc le sujet pur, car c’est la cicatrice de la brûlure.

29 Si un homme ou une femme a une plaie à la tête ou au menton, 30 le prêtre examinera cette plaie. Si elle forme un creux dans la peau et qu’il s’y trouve du poil jaunâtre ou clairsemé, il déclarera cette personne impure : c’est la teigne, c’est-à-dire une maladie de peau infectieuse de la tête ou du menton. 31 Mais si le prêtre constate, à l’examen, qu’il n’y a pas de creux visible de la peau, sans toutefois qu’il y ait de poil noir[c], il isolera le sujet pendant sept jours. 32 Le septième jour, s’il constate que l’éruption ne s’est pas étendue, qu’elle ne renferme pas de poil de couleur jaunâtre et que la plaie ne semble pas plus profonde que la peau, 33 le malade se rasera – sauf à l’endroit de la plaie – et le prêtre l’isolera de nouveau pour sept jours. 34 Le septième jour, il examinera le mal. Si le mal ne s’est pas étendu sur la peau et s’il ne forme pas de creux visible, il le déclarera pur ; le sujet nettoiera ses vêtements et il sera pur. 35 Mais si la teigne s’est étendue sur la peau après que le malade a été déclaré pur, 36 le prêtre en fera le constat et n’aura pas besoin de vérifier si le poil est de couleur jaunâtre : la personne est impure. 37 Si le mal semble stationnaire et que des poils sombres ont poussé à l’endroit malade, c’est qu’il est guéri et pur. Le prêtre déclarera la personne pure.

38 Si un homme ou une femme a des taches blanches sur la peau, 39 le prêtre l’examinera ; si les taches sont d’un blanc pâle, c’est une éruption bénigne : le sujet est pur.

40 Lorsqu’un homme perd ses cheveux, c’est une calvitie ; il est pur. 41 Si la tête se dégarnit sur le devant, c’est une calvitie du front ; il est pur. 42 Mais si une plaie d’un blanc rougeâtre apparaît dans la partie chauve sur la tête ou sur le front, c’est une plaie infectieuse qui a bourgeonné dans la partie chauve ou sur le front. 43 Si, à l’examen, le prêtre constate que la plaie provoque une boursouflure d’un blanc rougeâtre sur le crâne ou sur le front chauve, et qu’elle a l’aspect d’une maladie évolutive de la peau, 44 l’homme a une maladie infectieuse, il est impur, et le prêtre doit le déclarer impur. C’est à la tête que le mal l’a frappé.

45 La personne atteinte d’une telle maladie de la peau portera des vêtements déchirés et aura la tête décoiffée ; elle se couvrira la partie inférieure du visage[d] et criera : « Impur ! Impur ! » 46 Tant qu’elle a ce mal, elle est impure. Elle habitera à l’écart, à l’extérieur du camp.

Les moisissures sur les habits

47 Si une tache de moisissure apparaît sur des vêtements en laine ou en lin, 48 ou sur un tissu ou un tricot de lin ou de laine, ou encore sur une peau ou sur un objet en cuir, 49 si elle devient verdâtre ou rougeâtre, sur le vêtement ou sur la peau, sur le tissu ou le tricot ou sur tout objet en cuir, c’est une sorte d’infection[e] des tissus : on la montrera au prêtre. 50 Celui-ci l’examinera et enfermera l’objet atteint pendant sept jours. 51 Le septième jour, il examinera la tache. Si elle s’est étendue sur le vêtement, le tissu ou le tricot, sur la peau ou l’objet en cuir, il s’agit d’une moisissure maligne ; l’objet est impur. 52 Il le brûlera, quel qu’il soit, car il s’agit d’une moisissure maligne ; l’objet doit être brûlé au feu.

53 Mais si le prêtre constate que la tache ne s’est pas étendue sur l’objet, 54 il ordonnera de le laver, puis il le tiendra enfermé une deuxième semaine. 55 Après ce lavage, il examinera à nouveau la tache ; si elle n’a pas changé d’aspect de façon visible, même si elle ne s’est pas étendue, l’objet est impur et devra être brûlé, que la moisissure l’ait corrodé à l’endroit ou à l’envers. 56 Mais si le prêtre voit que la tache s’est estompée après le lavage, il arrachera cette partie du vêtement, de la peau, du tissu ou du tricot. 57 Si la tache réapparaît plus tard sur l’objet, c’est une moisissure qui se développe, tu brûleras l’objet où est la tache. 58 Quant au vêtement, au tissu, au tricot, ou à l’objet en cuir que tu auras lavé et d’où la tache aura disparu, tu le laveras une seconde fois, et il sera pur.

59 Telle est la loi relative à une tache de moisissure sur un vêtement de laine ou de lin, sur un tissu ou un tricot ou sur tout objet de cuir selon laquelle on déterminera s’il est pur ou impur.

Notas al pie

  1. 13.2 Le mot hébreu traditionnellement rendu par lèpre était utilisé pour différentes affections graves de la peau que nous n’appellerions pas lèpre. Ce même mot est utilisé pour des moisissures sur des tissus (13.47-59) ou sur des murs (14.33-53). D’où la traduction : « maladie de peau évolutive » ou « à caractère infectieux ». Voir 14.54-57.
  2. 13.18 Autres traductions : furoncle ou ulcère.
  3. 13.31 L’ancienne version grecque porte « poil jaunâtre ».
  4. 13.45 Manifestations habituelles du deuil (Lv 10.6 ; Ez 24.17).
  5. 13.49 Voir note v. 2.